Nelesi Rodriguez is a Venezuelan-born media educator, researcher, and practitioner. Before joining the Ph.D. program in Critical and Cultural Studies at the University of Pittsburgh, she came to the United States on a Fulbright Scholarship and got an MA in Media Studies from The New School. Broadly speaking, her research focuses on understandings of the body as a medium for knowledge and their potential impact on pedagogical practices. She is also interested in public scholarship, informal learning, and how creative practices are used/adapted as research and teaching methodologies.

Vanessa Vargas is a Venezuelan, Brooklyn-based dancer, performer, dance educator and researcher. She graduated in dance from the Escuela Taller de Danza de Caracas, she holds a degree in Mass Media and journalism, an MA in Mass Media and Social Research in Caracas Venezuela. She also holds an M.A in performance studies from Tisch School of Arts. She works in social practices, from dance and performance to communication, culture studies and social theory. Since 2002, she was part of the permanent cast of Taller de Danza De Caracas, The Venezuelan National Dance Company, and worked with various choreographers and independent artists in Latin America. She is based in New York since 2014, where she continues working as a dancer, performing for independent companies and also as a performing artist for the New York Museum of Modern Art (MoMa), teaching workshops, both theoretical and practical, creating choreographing projects through collaborative and interdisciplinary practices, through Dancelab, a dance project that connects dancers, performers, actors and visual artists. She has presented these works in different venues and events such as the Festival de Jóvenes Coreógrafos (Caracas, Venezuela), Dixon Place, Triskelion, Creators Collective, Pioneer Works (New York), Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, and Archi-Piel-Lago (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

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Joanna Ruth Evans is an artist, writer and scholar from South Africa. They hold a BA in Theater Making from the University of Cape Town, and an MA in Performance Studies from New York University. They will enter the Ph.D. program in Performance Studies (NYU) in Fall 2018. Their research follows decolonial movements and movement, drawing on queer, affect and new materialist theory, black studies, Latin American decolonialisms, and African philosophy. Their plays have toured South Africa, and to international festivals and theaters in Italy, Germany, Iran, Réunion, Hungary and the United States. Joanna lives in Brooklyn, where they make work with just about anyone they can, and especially their best friend Lua.

Lucas Girino (Lua) is a Brazilian video & movement artist and scholar based in Brooklyn. Their work happens amidst performance art, expanded cinema, contemporary dance, independent documentaries and undocumented phenomena. They are drawn to unusual spaces, prehensive performances, precarious consistencies, abyssal subjectivities, gender transgression, micropolitical glitches, insistent choreographies, and general delinquency. They will join the Ph.D. program in Performance Studies (NYU) in Fall 2018.

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Lane Lewis will probably always feel most at home in the smell of pine trees. They are currently interested in following trans(gender) in its movement between noun and verb, specifically as it manifests in the poetic breaking of lines. However, Lane is excited to have a reason to continue this project by way of an intergalactic foray into alternative formations of coupledom.

Sage E. Russo is currently an M.A. candidate at NYU Tisch in Performance Studies. Prior to their cross-country move, they gained an M.A. in Communication Studies from San Francisco State University. Their current research is focused on analyzing nonconforming performances of gender and sexuality, specifically within the context of intimate interactions in public space.

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Marcela Rodríguez is a writer, editor, and producer. She is the co-founder of publishing project PPS Editorial, and holds a Bachelor’s degree in Communications from Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP). She specializes in the Performing Arts, and edited the book Raíces y Semillas: Maestros y caminos del teatro en América Latina (2011) by Miguel Rubio Zapata (director of theater collective Yuyachkani). Since 2010, she has worked as a producer and content creator for cultural events in both the public and private sector.

Amelia Santana is a photographer, editor, and professor of entrepreneurship and culture. She is the co-founder of publishing project PPS Editorial, and holds an MBA from Columbia Business School. She specialized in project management at the IFC (World Bank Group) from 2009 – 2012, and was a photographer for the Centro de la Imagen in Lima from 2012 – 2014. She is currently professor of cultural entrepreneurship in institutions such as Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú (PUCP), Museum of Art of Lima (MALI), and Museum of Contemporary Art Lima (MAC-Lima).

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Movimiento Molcajete (M2) is a two-person theatre collective comprised of Nicole C. Limón and Andrea Porras. Founded in 1997, M2 created and toured two shows until 2003: Mujeria and Charcoal Foot Travels. Taking a break from the formal company to focus on individual works and graduate studies, M2 continued to perform as a duo off and on through to the present, participating as invited performers at poetry and theatre events, conferences, community events, and as workshop facilitators at a multitude of venues. M2 has performed at the Borderlands Festival (UC Irvine), La Pena Cultural Center (Berkeley, CA), and The Chicano/Latino Youth Leadership Conference (Sacramento), has produced events featuring The Last Poets and the Royal Chicano Air Force (RCAF artists collective), and presented at The Society for the Study Gloria Anzaldua’s inaugural “El Mundo Zurdo” conference (San Antonio). Both M2 founders were selected to represent Sacramento at the Latinx Theatre Commons “Encuentro de Las Americas” International Theatre Convening at the Los Angeles Theater Center in November 2017. Over the years Nicole and Yaya have successfully cultivated their individual work while continuing to nurture their duo/duality. Their chemistry on stage was apparent in a recent Sacramento staging of Evelina Fernandez’s two- woman play “How Else Am I Supposed to Know I’m Still Alive” which was extended for four weeks due to overwhelming audience response. From its inception, M2 has been committed to creating new works from a female indigenous perspective, that were by and for womxn, and that created opportunities in the industry, where there was a void. Nicole is currently a freelance director and teaches feminist, multicultural, and Latinx theatre at CSU, Sacramento. Andrea is an Arts Specialist with the California Arts Council. Both continue to perform in the local theatre community, and create original works and opportunities for emerging performers. Movimiento Molcajete has in recent years become a mentorship program and artist incubator for womxn and female identifying performers and theatre practitioners who aim to develop as artists and activists. M2 is committed to developing the artist, the craft, and the person.

Nicole C. Limón is an actor/director/deviser and teaches feminist, Latinx and multicultural theatre in the Department of Theatre and Dance at California State University, Sacramento. She studied directing with Yvonne Brewster, and holds an MFA in Acting from UC Davis. She studied at the Centre for Indigenous Theatre in Toronto where she focused on voice and traditional song and completed intensive clown training with John Turner of Mump and Smoot. Nicole also studied mask making and masked performance with Bruce Mars at Del’Arte International School of Physical Theatre. Recent credits include directing Welcome to Arroyo’s by Kristoffer Diaz (Teatro Espejo), and Esperanza Means Hope by Conrad Panganiban (My Sister’s House, Inc.), performing the role of Older Dede in In the Time of the Butterflies by Caridad Svich, and being the headlining performance with her theatre collective, Movimiento Molcajete, at the 2017 MALCS Summer Institute (Mujeres Activas en Letras y Cambio
Social). She is a participant in the Latinx Theatre Commons, an international network of theatre makers and scholars, and recently represented Sacramento at the Encuentro de Las Americas International Theatre Convening hosted by the Los Angeles Theatre Center. She is a proud company member and current President of the Board for Teatro Espejo, Sacramento’s premiere Latinx theatre company, and the author of BeYOU(-tiful), a full-length play about women’s journeys told through an indigenous persepective.

Andrea Yaya Porras is a Cultura Cura Ninja with curator, producer, actor, creative writer and documentarian superpowers. They currently serve as Arts Program Specialist with The California Arts Council, coordinating the Local Impact Grants and Artists Activating Communities program. They hold a B.A. in Theatre with a minor in Cultural Anthropology (and emphasis in dance and Dunham Technique) from California State University, Sacramento. They have been the recipient of fellowships from several arts and social justice organizations, some of which include: The California Speakers Office of Majority Services, United Farm Workers Headquarters, El Teatro Campesino, Brown Sheep Project/Guillermo Gomez-Peña, The Center for African Peace and Conflict Resolution, and the National Association of Latino Arts and Culture. They are the proud mama of fierce dance force JAH’Sol Amaru.

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Em Piro and Denise Rogers Valenzuela are experimental artists and scholars who immerse themselves and others into worlds of affective materials, the politics of things and routines, gender performance, abjection, and waste. Their shared practice is heavily kinesthetic and object focused, frequenting themes of environmental and political performance through playful participatory performance­ installations. Shared artistic and research interests include activist performance, decolonial feminism, creative collaboration, and subverted quotidian rituals. Their media are often bodies and things they scavenge and/or find (blankets to trash to food to voices). Their work, like their bodies, has moved around Toronto, St Louis, Santiago, New York, Seattle, and Berlin.

Em Piro (Seattle/St Louis/Nomadic) is an independent performance researcher. She holds a BA in Sociology and Anthropology from Saint Louis University, and an MA in Performance Studies from York University.

Denise Rogers Valenzuela (Santiago, Chile) is a second­year PhD student in Theater and Performance Studies at York University. She holds a BA in Arts and Humanities from the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, and an MA in Performance Studies from NYU.

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Marissa Brostoff is a doctoral candidate in the English department at the CUNY Graduate Center. Her dissertation, Adult Contemporary: Generational Time, Countercultural Narratives, and the Idea of the 1960s explores how Sixties counterculture’s equation of youth with radicalism changed temporality and narrative. Her work has appeared in publications including
differences, Post45, Situations, n+1, The New Republic, Jacobin, Salon, and Women & Performance, where she is also an editorial collective member.

Ethan Philbrick is a composer and writer who holds a PhD in Performance Studies at New York University. He has recently performed original work in New York at BRIC, NYU’s Skirball Center for the Performing Arts, SculptureCenter, Abrons Arts Center, and the Grey Art Gallery. His writing has been published in TDR, PAJ, Women & PerformanceStudies in Gender and Sexuality, and Movement Research Performance Journal.

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Andi Schwartz is a Ph.D. candidate in Gender, Feminist, and Women’s Studies at York University. She works at the intersection of critical femininities and digital representations. Her research interests include femme identities and communities, online subcultures and counterpublics, and radical softness. Her writing has been published in GUTS, Broken Pencil, Herizons, ShamelessDaily Xtra, and Ada: A Journal of Gender, New Media, and Technology.

Morgan Bimm is a Ph.D. student in the department of Gender, Feminist, and Women’s Studies at York University. Her research interests include integrating fandom studies and feminist theory, specifically as they relate to digital publics and online performances of girlhood. She is interested in the affect infused in fan spaces and especially in those communities built around traditionally ‘girly’ fan objects.

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Vanessa Meyer is a filmmaker, producer, and academic who has worked in film and tv in Montreal and New York for the past 10 Years. Currently Head of Development for Brooklyn based documentary production company Hard Working Movies and Programming Manager for Frontières International co-pro market, Vanessa’s experience spans both fiction and non fiction realms. She is currently completing her doctoral thesis in feminist media studies from Concordia University and co-hosting a life advice podcast.

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Nicole Clouston is a practice-based researcher currently completing her Ph.D. in Visual Art at York University. In her practice she asks: What happens when we acknowledge, through an embodied experience, our connection to a world teeming with life both around and inside us? What does a meaningful alliance between human and non-human life look like? Nicole has exhibited across Canada in Montreal, Victoria, Edmonton, and Toronto. She is currently the artist-in-residence at the Coalesce Bio Art Lab at the University at Buffalo.

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Erin Obodiac received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Irvine and has held teaching and research appointments at UC Irvine, the University of Leeds, SUNY Albany, and Cornell University. Her writings assemble residual questions from the deconstructive legacy with emergent discourses on technics and animality, media ecology, and machinic subjectivity. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at Cornell University, completing a book called The Transhuman Interface, which repositions critical theory and deconstruction within the history of cybernetics and machinic life. The Transhuman Interface is a result of the research project “Robots at Risk: Transgenic Art and Corporate Personhood,” which Obodiac began as a Fellow at Cornell’s Society for the Humanities. The project and the accompanying book manuscript examine contemporary theories of machinic life and robotics as well as the philosophical traditions that underpin them.

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Fenella Kennedy is a Ph.D. Candidate at the Ohio State University, where they study the interaction of dance, language and ideology. They were delighted last year to be the first openly non-binary author published in Dance Chronicle. They organize Fusion and Blues dances for the Columbus Dance Eclectic and the national social dance community, and enjoy travelling
nationally to teach, dance, and organize.

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Ingrid Becker and Hannah Brooks-Motl have been studying Duncan dance with Jennifer Sprowl since 2014, and are ensemble members of Sprowl’s company, Duncan Dance Chicago. Since 2015 they have been exploring links between Duncan dance and ordinary and poetic language in collaborative performances at venues including The Poet’s Theater-Chicago, the Logan Center
for the Arts at the University of Chicago, and the Isadora Duncan International Symposium in San Francisco.

Ingrid Becker is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago and holds an MA from Boston University and an MSt from the University of Oxford. Her dissertation, Sociological Poetics in the 20th and 21st Centuries: Imagining the Self as Social Problem, develops an interdisciplinary account of the limits and possibilities of individual self-expression and collective representation since the early 1900s.

Hannah Brooks-Motl is the author of two poetry collections; her criticism has appeared widely and an article on the poetry and prose of Sylvia Townsend Warner is forthcoming from Modernism/modernity. She is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of Chicago, where her dissertation focuses on space, politics, and pastoral in mid-20 th century aesthetic and intellectual culture.

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Yve Laris Cohen’s work has been presented and commissioned by The Kitchen, SculptureCenter, Performance Space New York, Company Gallery, Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego, and the 2014 Whitney Biennial, among others. He holds an MFA in Visual Arts from Columbia University.

Sarah Richter is a Ph.D. candidate in Performance Studies at New York University and recipient of the Paulette Goddard Award for Innovative Scholarship. She is the Performance Reviews Editor at Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory.

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Leticia Robles-Moreno holds a Ph.D. from New York University’s Department of Performance Studies, where she was awarded the Deena Burton Memorial Award for Outstanding Dissertation Research. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Humanities with emphasis in Linguistics and Literature from the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. She also holds a Master’s degree in Latin American Literature from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and has taught Spanish, Latin American culture, Critical Theory, and Writing classes at several college levels. In addition to her academic background, she studied Theater Arts in the Club de Teatro de Lima, and has participated in various workshops on improvisational theater and Theater of the Oppressed techniques. Her MA thesis, Staging Real Time: Absent Presences in Forging/Inhabiting Fragmented Bridges through Video Chat Connections, explored the ways in which new technologies might be used to generate alternative political subjects, communities, and spaces of belonging. Her doctoral research is focused on the role of theatre groups of “creación colectiva” in recent Latin American socio-political contexts – particularly in Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador – exploring their networked practices as strategies of survival, from a combined perspective of Performance Studies and Affect Studies. As member of the Women Mobilizing Memory research group at the Center for the Study of Social Difference at Columbia University, she has studied Latin American Antigones’ role in post-conflict contexts. She has published scholarly articles in Latin American Theatre Review, Contemporary Theatre Review, and Conjunto. She is currently visiting assistant professor at Muhlenberg College.

Sareh Z. Afshar is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Performance Studies at NYU. She holds a master’s degree from the same department, and another in communication and creative arts from Purdue, with a concentration in media and cultural studies. Her areas of research include public affect and the aesthetics of everyday life, visuality/materiality, memory and trauma theory, body-/bio-politics, and new media. Her dissertation, tentatively titled Dying to be Somebody: Performances of Death, Personhood and Power in Postrevolutionary Iran, theorizes what she is calling “performances of death” (PoD); i.e., hypervisual performances that materialize around death and its commemoration—or lack thereof—in postrevolutionary Iran, to question the manner in which they inform the sociopolitical agency of Iranian subjects born during the Iran-Iraq war (1980–88). Examining photographs, films, cartoons, sculptors, urban visuals and rituals, she argues for the PoD’s potential in identifying the overlooked, localized affects specific to this population; which in turn are helping dispel the sense of fatalism deeply rooted in the Iranian imaginary, consequently making possible the conjuring of alternative collective destinies. Author of “Are We Neda? The Iranian Women, the Election, and International Media,” she has served as assistant and managing editor to emisférica, TDR: The Drama Review, and Ravagh: A Journal of Arts & Culture (in Farsi). She has lost two cities—lovely ones, Montréal and Tehran—but deems New York a most soothing compromise. Currently, she is adjunct faculty at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts, College of Arts & Science, and Tandon School of Engineering.

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Yatta Zoker is a Houston-born interdisciplinary artist, digipoet and musician currently based in Brooklyn, NY. Using incantations born of loop pedal drones, folk acoustics, and ecstatic beats, they alchemize and creolize jazz vocals w/ Krio cries to create music to lie down in. Past performances + workshops have taken place in friends’ backyards, community farms, Afrofuturism conferences, The Brooklyn Museum, Powrplnt, The Brooklyn Electronic Music Festival, MOMA PS1, Issue Project Room, Roulette, and about 72 other places. Their music and poetry has been featured in Rookie Magazine, Dazed, Mask Magazine, Tiny
Mixtapes, Artforum, and more.

Zeelie Brown transforms art spaces into utopic, black, trans-feminine, post-internet refuges called “soulscapes” merging cello performance, electronic music, and installation art to overturn landscapes of capital intent on the economic genocide of queer blackpeople. She depth charges Yoruba and Kikongo embodied philosophies, met with the folk theory of her family’s maroon Alabama homestead, in order that those who experience her soulscapes leave freed. Zeelie was a 2017 Southern Constellations Fellow, a Fellow at the Caribbean Cultural Center, and a Column Shifting Fellow at the Flux Factory. She has performed at RISD, Flux Factory, Elsewhere, Recess Gallery, Project Row Houses, and Harvard University. Zeelie has been featured in Art in America and The Village Voice.

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Founded by two women who have been coupled for more than twelve years, Kegels for Hegel is an open collaboration of academics and artists that works the brain as well as the pelvic floor. Straddling philosophical smutcore and tongue in chic, we are a semi-anonymous conceptual project that queers up the work of philosophers through song and music videos. Both sexing and messing things up at the same time, we are currently working on the album Fucking with Philosophers. Our projects often both disrespect and pay homage to the ideas and projects of theorists. We are interested in the “work” that an artwork performs: we take the language of academic discourse and make it speak in the dialect of pop. It engages the subversive possibilities of drag culture and performance spectacle. Our project is, in great part, a product of the decentralized, global networks of production. As academics, we travel often: we conduct research and attend conferences, we move to teach at universities or engage in field work. Through Kegels for Hegel, we take advantage of these opportunities to produce work in different places and through varied means. The project exists as performances at art spaces and online in the form of songs and videos. Our work is not pedagogical as such but rather dialogical. Our projects so far have made works in conjunction with curators, artists, scientists, academics, and
designers. With them we write and perform songs, create videos, make performances, and produce merchandise. The “band”’s core members are an art historian and an anthropologist. We study, respectively, contemporary Mexican art based in collaboration and collectivity and issues of value(s), sex work, and the rescue industry on the US/Mexico border. We perform songs that we write as a means to engage with the thinkers that have inspired our academic work.

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Jaime Shearn Coan is a writer and Ph.D. Candidate in English at The Graduate Center, CUNY. He currently serves as a Mellon Digital Publics Fellow at The Center for the Humanities, where he partners with the CUNY Dance Initiative and JACK. His writing has appeared in publications including The Brooklyn Rail, Critical Correspondence, Drain Magazine, Jacket2, Movement Research Performance JournalTDR: The Drama Review, Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry and Poetics, and Women & Performance. Jaime is a co-editor of the 2016 Danspace Project catalogue Lost and Found: Dance, New York, HIV/AIDS, Then and Now and is the author of the poetry chapbook Turn it Over, published by Argos Books.

Tara Aisha Willis is a dance artist, Ph.D. candidate in Performance Studies at NYU and after several years as an administrator for programming and diversity initiatives at Movement Research, recently became Associate Curator of Performance at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago. She currently performs in a collaboration between choreographer Will Rawls and poet Claudia Rankine, and in works by Kim Brandt, Megan Byrne, and Yanira Castro. She was part of the first performance by The Skeleton Architecture, a collective of black women and gender non-conforming dancers and improvisors, and was archivist/dramaturg for an in-process collaboration between Ni’Ja Whitson and Jaamil Olawale Kosoko. Her choreography has been shown at Movement Research at Judson Church, BAX/Brooklyn Arts Exchange, Roulette, THROW, Dixon Place, The Painting Center, AUNTS, the CURRENT SESSIONS, Center for Performance Research, and Draft Works at Danspace Project. She was a 2009 Dance Theater Workshop Van Lier Fellow, a 2016 Chez Bushwick Artist in Residence, co-curator of the Movement Research Festival Spring 2016: Hand Written Note(s), recipient of NYU’s 2017 Stefanos Tsigrimanis Artistic Scholar Award. She has been Women & Performance’s performance reviews editor, TDR’s co-managing editor, and co-edited, with Thomas F. DeFrantz, a special issue of The Black Scholar on black dance studies (2016). Other writings appear in Movement Research Performance Journal, The Brooklyn RailMagazin im AugustVoices from the Bush, and a Danspace Project Platform catalogue (forthcoming 2018).

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Kemi Adeyemi and Sampada Aranke are Assistant Professors at the University of Washington and School of the Art Institute, Chicago, respectively. Our work considers performance theories of embodiment, visual culture, and black cultural and aesthetic theory. We have written on contemporary practices in outlets ranging from e-flux, Artforum, and Art Journal to Sounding Out!, Palimpsest, and QED. This work has included catalog essays for Kambui Olujimi, Zachary Fabri, Sadie Barnette, Jovencio de la Paz, Oliverio Rodriguez, Marianne Fairbanks, and others. We look forward to convening conferences, colloquia, festivals,
and exhibitions in London, New York, Chicago, Seattle, and the Bay Area over the duration of 2018 and 2019.

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Bryony White is an AHRC funded doctoral Candidate in the English Department at King’s College London. Her doctoral project explores the intersections of performance, contemporary art and the law. She has published in Studies in Theatre and Performance and Theatre Journal. She is responsible for convening King’s Performance Research Group’s Performance/Museum/Practice research seminar and is PGR Chair for the King’s research centre, Queer@King’s. She has also published widely in magazines and art journals including Hazlitt, Times Literary Supplement, ArtMonthly, LA Review of Books, The Atlantic, and Elephant Magazine. From 2016-2017, she ran a non-fiction research group at the South London Gallery.

Rafael Lubner is a doctoral candidate in the Department of English at King’s College London. His research focusses on articulations of humanness in contemporary literature. He teaches Literary Theory at King’s and writes music criticism for Tiny Mix Tapes.

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Broderick D.V. Chow is Senior Lecturer in Theatre at Brunel University London andPrincipal Investigator on the AHRC-funded research project Dynamic Tensions: NewMasculinities in the Performance of Fitness (www.dynamictensions.com). As part of
Dynamic Tensions, he was a visiting scholar at the H.J. Lutcher Stark Center for Physical Culture and Sports, University of Texas at Austin (February 2017) and a visiting scholar at University at Buffalo, SUNY (October 2017). He is co-editor of Žižek and Performance (Palgrave 2014) and Performance and Professional Wrestling (Routledge 2016), and is part of the editorial team for Contemporary Theatre Review: Interventions. Broderick is an amateur Olympic Weightlifter and a BWL Level 1 Qualified Weightlifting Coach.

Eero Laine is an Assistant Professor of Theatre in the Department of Theatre and Dance at the University at Buffalo, State University of New York. He is currently finishing his book, Professional Wrestling and the Commercial Stage, which engages
the often peculiar performance form of professional wrestling to examine issues of labor, class, and the financial and global infrastructures of live, popular entertainment. His work has been published in Performance Research, Theatre
Journal, GPS: Global Performance Studies, Western European Stages, and Contemporary Theatre Review’s “Interventions.” He co-edited the volume Performance and Professional Wrestling (Routledge 2017) and is a co-editor of Lateral (csalateral.org), the peer-reviewed, open-access journal of the Cultural Studies Association. Eero is both a member of the Future Advisory Board and the Secretary of the Board of Performance Studies International.